Visiting Plitvice Lakes National Park

Travertine – a lime stone deposit from mineral springs.

Situated three hours North of Split, on the Bosnia-Herzegovina border is the mesmerizing natural wonder and UNESCO protected  – Plitvice Lakes National Park. Over thousands of years deposited Travertine build-ups have formed dams which gave life to over sixteen natural lakes. The iconic turquoise water is so brilliant because the lake bottom lacks mud and contain minerals which form the Travertine.  The park protects about 73,000 acres worth of untouched wilderness. A wilderness so dense that the park is home to wolves, bears, lynx and pole cats (wild ferrets).

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No idea who this kid is but, he totally thinks the photo was for him 🙂

How to get here:

 As I was staying in Split, I actually booked a tour which worked out better in the long run. It’s about a three hour drive north of Split. There are many options to get to Plitvice: buses, tours, car rentals. It depends on how long and how far you would like to hike.

Prices and Such:

If you go during slow season the entrance fee is about 55 kuna or $8. Sounds great right? In peak season be prepared to dodge crowds and pay up to 180 kuna or $26. If you drive, parking is $7 per hour. Be sure to keep your ticket on you at all times and handy if you wish to take a ferry. The wooden bridges are fairly wide but, be prepared to negotiate space.

Bring water and a snack. I wouldn’t spend money within the park unless absolutely necessary. With that said, there is a bar located in the center of the park.

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Swimming is STRICTLY prohibited. Just like touching stalactites in caves, skin oils and acidity can harm the natural process of Travertine forming. As tempting as it may be, keep out of the water.

Right? I would jump in.DSCN1510

Some of the deeper lakes are about 44m (144ft) but, its hard to tell because the water is so clear. The creation story of the lakes tells of villagers who experienced a terrible drought. They prayed to the Black Queen (or witch, depending on the storyteller) to help them. She sent rains and storms to fill the river beds back up. She then told them to protect the area and guard it from being destroyed. In 1949 UNESCO protected the area!

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Here is my happy spot of the day! Peering over a railing you can see how the river snakes through the valley and the terraces that the Traverine forms.

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There are many fish to see! The most common being Brown Trout. They float calmly in the shallows and feed on food that travels down river.

Nearly all of the trails are bridges to take you through the complicated system of waterfalls and streams. Pay attention: there are no rails and sometimes it’s hard to see steps. Especially, hard to miss while taking in the beauty.

Please go see Plitvice Lake National Park. Nature lover or not, the area will get your attention!

Your Cobweb Clearer, Kate

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Visiting Plitvice Lakes National Park

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15 thoughts on “Visiting Plitvice Lakes National Park

    1. Right 🙂 I heard at Krka National Park you can jump in. It’s similar and about an hour south to Plitvice but a little smaller.

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  1. Plitvice Lake National Park looks absolutely breathtaking…and that water! Oh my word, it looks so tempting, not sure I would be able to resist not jumping in. 🙂

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  2. I’m dying to visit Plitvice! 3 hours was too much of a journey for us from Split so we actually ended up going to Krka instead, but Plitvice is still on the bucket list 🙂 Beautiful photos!

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  3. We went on a car trip through Croatia, last year, and of course we could not miss Plitvice.
    We loved the lakes a lot, one of the most beautiful places I have traveled. It;s crowded in peak season, but the beauty of the place is breathtaking.

    Here is also my article on the trip, actually a comparison between Plitvice and another beautiful park, Krka. Would love to have your support also.

    https://egodiary.com/2017/05/24/plitvice-lakes-or-krka-waterfalls-which-one-is-better/

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